Tai Chi and Me…

When I was in high school I was not interested in football, baseball or basketball and when my biology teacher, who was also the coach for the school football team, asked me what I was interested in I told him sword fighting sounded pretty cool to me. Since the school did not offer swordsmanship as an elective sport he referred me to a friend of his who was part of a group of men who met regularly to practice sword and shield fighting with homemade armor and weapons. I took to this unusual sport as a duck to water, met with the group three evenings a week for several years for individual and group instruction. The thing I liked most about this strange sport was working out with men who desired from their training, among other things, a chance to manifest their personal “warrior’s code”. These men took me under their wing and tried to groom not only my sword skills but also my blossoming personal ethic.

After high school my interest in the sword led me to the college fencing team and I was advised by the fencing instructor that learning Judo would help me with my centering and stances on the piste or fencing strip. I loved Judo and even though I was in a very light weight class the matches against heavier opponents did teach me the value of very low stances which greatly improved my leg strength and my fencing form.

Immediately after college I was fortunate enough to meet Dr. Hui Chen. Dr. Chen had been a medical herbalist in Taiwan and was an expert in Tai Chi Chuan and Qigong. He held classes at his home and depending on his work schedule we met two to three times per week. After years of tuition Dr. Chen deemed me fit to become an instructor myself and since then I have been teaching Tai Chi and various forms of Qigong at Colleges, Universities, Park and recreation facilities and martial arts centers around the US.

After my time with Dr. Chen I still yearned for the discipline, camaraderie and sport of the so called external martial arts and studied for many years achieving expert ranking in the Chinese arts of Yu Long Gong Fu, Chuan Fa, Tai Chi Chuan and Qigong. I also studied extensively the Japanese arts of Aikido, Judo and Iado (Japanese sword, back to my old friend the sword) and Korean Se Jong Taekwondo with Professor Randy Miskech, one of the greatest martial artists it has ever been my pleasure to know.

Over the forty year span of time from Dr. Chen to Professor Miskech, the matrix that held everything together was the daily practice of Tai Chi and Qigong. As I become older in years and wisdom, I recall the advice of Dr. Chen that as I age I should “put away the hard yang of the external arts in favor of the soft yin of the internal arts so that you can experience the bright yang of the spiritual arts”.

The matrix to the “bright yang” that I offer to you is the Jade Dragon. This is the one system of Qigong that I, as a physician and practitioner, can endorse for just about anybody regardless of his or her medical model. The system is so balanced that in the decades that I have been teaching and prescribing it to patients, I have never once had any negative feedback associated with it. It is also so easy to learn, that it is one of the few Qigong systems that can be taught via DVD. One to one instruction is best, and that goes for the Jade Dragon Qigong as well. But, the Jade Dragon DVD was developed by a doctor for his patients, and as such is quite unique in the realm Qigong DVD instruction.

The same is true of Jade Dragon Tai Chi, another component of the Jade Dragon family of internal martial arts. Both the Tai Chi and Qigong forms are available on the same DVD and were written and produced by myself. I make myself available for questions and critiques of your form via email or video and have had wide success with this manner of teaching.

The DVD and written manual are available for $40.00 which includes shipping and handling. I highly urge you to take advantage of this beautiful Qigong and Tai Chi system and I look forward to assisting in your learning experience.

Yours in Health,

Robert Kienitz, DTCM

Vero Beach, FL

http://www.atlantic-acupuncture.com/store/?model_number=Jade-Dragon

Modern Oncology and Chinese Medicine

Oncology tells us that a cancer cell is an irregularly formed, rapidly regenerating type of mutant cell that can appear almost anywhere in the human body. Normally human cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells age and weaken or are damaged they die and new cells take their place. When mutant cells develop this orderly process breaks down. As cells become more and more abnormal, old or damaged cells survive when they should not and new cells form when they are not needed. These mutant cells can divide continuously and may collect to form growths called tumors.

Cancer cells can move through the body along regular pathways, like the lymphatic system, in a process called metastasis. Metastatic cancer holds a similar molecular feature to the original cells so breast cancer that has metastasized to the lung is still breast cancer but now resides in the lung.

For a very long time the conventional wisdom in the biomedical treatment of cancer was some combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. That is, cut the tumor out, burn it, poison it or all three. Most recently, over the last twenty years, biomedicine has been exploring the potential of immunotherapy also known as biotherapy for cancer treatment. In biotherapy the subject’s immune system is enhanced using specific or broad spectrum protein antibodies like immunoglobulin either to enhance the body’s entire immune system or to focus an attack on particular types of cancer cells.

Your immune system is a collection of organs, special cells, and substances that help protect you from infections and other diseases. Immune cells like white blood cells, and the substances they make, travel through your body to protect it from germs that cause infections. They also help protect you from cancer, there are mutant cells forming in the body all the time and the immune system regularly purges them from our systems.

The immune system keeps track of all of the substances normally found in the body. Any newly introduced substance that the immune system doesn’t recognize triggers an immuno response, causing the immune system to attack it. For example, germs contain certain proteins that are not normally found in the human body. The immune system sees these as “foreign” and attacks them. The immune response can destroy anything containing the foreign substance, such as germs or cancer cells.

Another cutting edge concept in cancer therapy is starving cancer cells of certain amino acids like glutamine and even glucose, yes, that’s sugar. While the science of cancer cell starvation is just being looked at, we in traditional Chinese medicine have been using both the starvation of cancer sites well as the use of immunological enhancements for cancer disruption for quite some time.

Chinese medical literature suggests using herbal formulas that are also used for chronic viral diseases, i.e., biotherapy. Chronic viruses integrate into the DNA which must then be activated for a virus to express itself within the body.. Cancer cells similarly have a DNA segment that causes uncontrolled reproduction of cells that must also be activated to stimulate this growth. The Chinese anti cancer formulas use herb combinations that prevent the activation of dormant DNA strands that can cause the disease.

Chinese medicine has also been using herbs and formulas that break up what we refer to as stasis to reduce tumors, cysts and other unwanted growths for hundreds of years. Modern research in China is now showing that the herbs that break up the tumors are in fact introducing chemicals to the tumor that inhibit the uptake of certain key nutrients by the cancer cells, thus starving them and causing them to die off without subdividing.

Here in the Western world we usually offer traditional Chinese medicine as a support for more conventional cancer therapies. We are able to offset many of the debilitating side effects of chemo and radiation therapies and help people survive their cancer and flourish afterward. It is our hope here at Atlantic Acupuncture that more and more people will start to utilize the concepts of cutting edge oncology that have been used successfully by Chinese doctors for hundreds of years.

Yours in good health,

Robert Kienitz, DTCM

Atlantic Acupuncture of Vero Beach FL.

Golden Needles & Electric Qi

In the middle of the last century there was a Master Acupuncturist in China named Wang Le-Ting. Master Wang was renowned for many important accomplishments throughout his career and there have been several books written by and about him.

I came to know of Master Wang’s writings years ago through my Chinese professors and became fascinated by one of his key theories about the practice of acupuncture, that is, the “herbalization” of acupuncture.

Wang believed that just as herbal medicines have specific functions like clearing heat, draining damp and breaking through blood stasis, so too, specific acupuncture points had the same effects on the bioenergetic system. He went on to develop acupuncture formulas to match herbal formulas so that any given herbal formulas actions could be duplicated and reinforced by this system of acupuncture.

Take for instance the formula Si Jun Zi Tang also known as Four Gentlemen Decoction. This is a formula that tonifies the Qi and strengthens the primary digestion of the spleen and stomach. This base formula can be combined with other herbs to treat everything from hypothyroidism to eczema and irritable bowel syndrome to hepatitis.

The composition of the formula is:

Ren Shen Ginseng tonifies Qi and strengthens the spleen and stomach for primary digestion.

Bai Zhu Atractylodes strengthens the spleen, augments Qi and drains damp accumulations.

Fu Ling Poria dries damp accumulations and strengthens the spleen.

Zhi Gan Cao Glycyrrhizae harmonizes, warms and strengthens all of the organs of the middle torso.

In this formula we have two herbs that tonify Qi, four herbs that strengthen the spleen and stomach, two herbs that dry the damp accumulations that cause retardation of digestive function and one herb that warms the organs helping that part of the digestive function that relies on metabolic warmth.

Our acupuncture formula wants to follow the same functions as the herbs so we can choose two points that tonify the Qi like Qi Hai CV 6 and Tong Gu BL 66. We can also use points to fortify the spleen and supplement the middle organs like Di JI SP 8 and Gong Sun SP 4. We can choose two herbs that dry damp accumulations like Fu Liu KI 7 and San Yin Jiao ST 36. We also want to choose a point that will warm the intended organs like Yin Bai SP 1.

Using this method of selection we are able to duplicate all of the intended actions of the herbal formula Four Gentlemen Decoction with a matching acupuncture prescription except for one.

In our herbal formula we provide substances (Ginseng and Atractylodes), that actually create Qi in the body. In our acupuncture formula the points we use to tonify Qi actually do not add anything to the body, they encourage the tonification of Qi through normal organic functions. The needle themselves cannot add qi to the body except with the use of one thing, electric Qi.

If the concept of bio electricity had been known by the ancients it would have been one of the definitions of Qi. Further, I believe that the definitions of Qi that developed over time were in fact attempts to explain the electrochemical nature of the human body.

Electricity by definition is hot in nature and flows along regular pathways (circuits). Electricity animates (provides movement to machines and bio entities) and disperses if it is not contained. Electricity Illuminates, always seeks a ground (Yin) and moves with great speed. Electricity is matter without form and it transforms as in an electrochemical reactions. In TCM we know the nature of a thing by observation of its characteristics; the above is a clear definition of nothing other than Yang Qi.

By adding mild electrical stimulation to the points that we chose for augmenting the Qi we are actually adding Yang Qi to the body at those points. This completes the reproduction of our herbal formula, Four Gentlemen, with our acupuncture formula. They now match each other in every way.

The herbal medicine works on the body from the inside out exactly as the acupuncture works on the body from the outside in. This dynamic brings about a more timely and effective therapeutic response than either therapy alone.

If you are receiving herbal medicine and acupuncture from us at Atlantic Acupuncture of Vero Beach, this is the paradigm from which we work and one of the reasons for our incredible success with our clients and friends.

Yours in good health,

Robert Kienitz, DTCM

Placebos, Faith Healing and Modern Medicine

I began my studies of traditional Chinese medicine In the mid 1970’s, I was perusing an undergraduate degree while working part time as an animal handler at an equine veterinary clinic in Phoenix, Arizona.

Dr. Saum, the vet, had gone up to Vancouver BC to learn animal acupuncture from a famous Chinese doctor. When Doc returned he was so excited about acupuncture it was the only modality he wanted to use to treat the horses and other large animals we saw at the clinic.

One of my jobs was to take the horses from their trailers to the treatment stalls and “gentle” them with a brush or by caressing their muzzle with calming words and gentle songs while we waited for Doc. That was the best part of the job.

Because acupuncture was new to Doc and I was handy, he would talk to me about where each needle went, how deep and at what angle it should be inserted and all about what the Chinese said the needle would accomplish. I think by downloading the information so precisely to me he was keeping it straight in his own mind.

Once I overheard Doc and one of the cowboys whose horse we were treating talking about the placebo effect, the cowboy thought that was all there was to “this Chinese voodoo” that Doc was practicing. Doc asked the cowboy if he had had any conversations with his horse about acupuncture. The man said no. Doc asked me if I had been talking to the horse about the wonders of acupuncture and I said I hadn’t. Doc said as far as he knew the horse had no conception at all about the effects of acupuncture and had no personal opinion about medicine, Chinese or otherwise. “When I put a needle in a horse to make him eat, he eats. When I put a needle in to make him poop, he poops.” “There ain’t any placebo effect in animal acupuncture”.

Faith healing is modern Christianized term for shamanism. A shaman is a person regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world that exists between the physical and that which is beyond our normal senses.

A Shaman is one who practices divination and healing using herbs, incantation, ritual and imagery. Archeological evidence demonstrates that at the dawn of Chinese history, before the second millennium BCE prior to the Shang dynasty the primary health care providers were Shamans (Wu). This is in fact true for all cultures throughout the prehistoric world.

In ancient times disease was thought to originate from one of two probable causes. Either one had done something to aggravate the harmony of one’s ancestors or one had been invaded by an evil immaterial entity. There were two clear courses of therapy for these disease causes; either the ancestor was placated through ritual and offerings or the evil entity was induced to leave the host using shock and fright with loud noises and flashes of light like fireworks in China. The shaman might also menace a possessed host with scary chants and sharp sticks or spears to drive the evil entity away. Some anthropologists believe that the sharp stick thing eventually may have eventually evolved into acupuncture.

The current healthcare debate has brought up basic questions about how modern medicine should work. On one hand we have the medical establishment with its enormous cadre of M.D.s, medical schools, big pharma, and incredibly expensive hospital care. On the other we have the barely tolerated field of alternative medicine that attracts millions of patients a year and embraces hundreds of treatment modalities not taught in conventional medical schools.

Conventional mainstream medicine promotes the notion that it alone should be considered medicine, but more and more this claim is being exposed as an officially sanctioned myth. When scientific minds turn to tackling the complex business of healing the sick, they simultaneously warn us that it’s dangerous and foolish to look at integrative medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, or indigenous medicine for answers. Because these other modalities are enormously popular, mainstream medicine has made a few grudging concessions to the placebo effect, natural herbal remedies, and acupuncture over the years. But M.D.s are still taught that other approaches are risky and inferior to their own training; they insist, year after year, that all we need are science-based procedures and the huge spectrum of drugs upon which modern medicine depends. Even the American Board of Medical Acupuncture an MD only organization, considers its members to be superior in the field of acupuncture with only 200 hours of training compared to the thousands of hours required by licensed acupuncturists. Their assertion is that their advanced knowledge of biomedicine fills in any gaps in their acupuncture training.

If a pill or surgery won’t do the trick, most patients are sent home to await their fate. There is an implied faith here that if a new drug manufacturer has paid for the research for FDA approval, then it is scientifically proven to be effective. As it turns out, this belief is by no means fully justified.

The British Medical Journal recently undertook an analysis of common medical treatments to determine which are supported by sufficient reliable scientific evidence. They evaluated around 2,500 treatments, and the results were as follows:

  • 13 percent were found to be beneficial
  • 23 percent were likely to be beneficial
  • Eight percent were as likely to be harmful as beneficial
  • Six percent were unlikely to be beneficial
  • Four percent were likely to be harmful or ineffective.

This left the largest category, 46 percent, as unknown in their effectiveness. In other words, when you take your sick child to the hospital or clinic, there is only a 36 percent chance that he will receive a treatment that has been scientifically demonstrated to be either beneficial or likely to be beneficial. This is remarkably similar to the results Dr. Brian Berman found in his analysis of completed Cochrane reviews of conventional medical practices. There, 38 percent of treatments were positive and 62 percent were negative or showed “no evidence of effect.”

For those who have been paying attention, this is not news. Back in the late 70’s the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment determined that a mere 10 to 20 percent of the practices and treatment used by physicians are scientifically validated. It’s sobering to compare this number to the chances that a patient will receive benefit due to the placebo effect, which is between 30 percent and 50 percent, according to various studies.

The news last fall that stents inserted in patients with heart disease to keep arteries open work no better than a placebo ought to be shocking. Each year, hundreds of thousands of American patients receive stents for the relief of chest pain, and the cost of the procedure ranges from $11,000 to $41,000 in US hospitals.

In 2002, The New England Journal of Medicine published a study demonstrating that a common knee operation, performed on millions of Americans who have osteoarthritis — an operation in which the surgeon removes damaged cartilage or bone (“arthroscopic debridement”) and then washes out any debris (“arthroscopic lavage”) — worked no better at relieving pain or improving function than a sham procedure. Those operations can go for $5,000 a shot.

One root of the problem is that the coalition in favor of evidence-based medicine is weak. It includes too few doctors, commands too little attention and energy from elected officials and advocates, and it is shot through with partisanship. Naturally, pharmaceutical companies and medical device makers wish to protect their profits, regardless of the comparative effectiveness of other treatments (or cost effectiveness) of what they are selling.

While virtually all doctors support evidence-based medicine in the abstract, clinicians and medical societies seek to maintain their professional and clinical autonomy. Physicians are sensitive to being second-guessed, even when their beliefs about how well treatments work are based on their own experiences and intuitions, not rigorous studies.

So, do we dump conventional mainstream medicine? Of course not, I do not propose that we give up the life saving drugs and procedures that are the wonder of modern medicine, but I do suggest that blind faith in allopathic medicine is as misguided as blind faith in alternative medicine. Further research is needed in both allopathic and alternative medicines but it is slow going because the expense of research is often prohibitive. If we were to bring the cold eye of science to every aspect of medicine, accepting and using only that which had been fully scientifically validated and proven, we would have very little medicine at all.

Yours in good health,

Robert Kienitz, DTCM

Atlantic Acupuncture

Vero Beach, FL

Playing with Pain?

Florida is the tennis capital of North America and Vero Beach is right in the heart of it all. Of all the sports injuries I see in the clinic the most common are related to tennis.

Did you know that 53% of amateur tennis players and 30% of professionals will play with an injured back this year? Tennis injuries can result from a combination of poor posture, lack of muscle flexibility and co-ordination and incorrect training regimens.

The most common tennis injuries occur in the lower back, knees, ankles, shoulders, elbows, hands and wrists (is there anything left?).

The top ten tennis related injuries are;

  1. Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow
  2. Rotator Cuff Tendinopathies (pathology of the tendon)
  3. Patellar Tendinopathies
  4. Achilles Tendinopathies
  5. Stress Fractures
  6. Torn Cartilage
  7. Dislocations / Separations(often the shoulder)
  8. Sprains– (Torn ligaments)
  9. Achilles Tendon Rupture
  10. Strains– (Torn tendons)

Tennis injuries are generally defined as either cumulative (overuse) or acute (traumatic) injuries. The impact and stress of the repetitive motions both upper and lower body are sometimes hard on the muscles and joints, especially if you ignore the early warning signs of an injury such as; joint pain, tenderness, swelling, reduced range of motion, comparative weakness, numbness and tingling.

Of the top ten injuries that can occur when playing tennis, Acupuncture treats nine directly and very successfully. The fifth (stress fracture) can be treated indirectly by decreasing pain and healing time.

Acupuncture improves flexibility, circulation, balance & coordination which will help keep you injury free and helps reduce down time after any injury.

Acupuncture is safe, effective and works quickly. Most of the athletes I treat say that acupuncture also has the added benefit of helping to get them into that zone of mental clarity and relaxation that is so important to their game.

Whether you want to tune up your back, tune up your game or both, Acupuncture can help you arrive on the court pain free and playing like a pro.

Yours in good health,

Cindy & Robert Kienitz

Fatigue, Qi vacuity and Chinese Medicine

In the traditional Chinese medical paradigm we see that many diseases can be caused by one of two malfunctions in our bio systems. Either there is an imbalance between the needs and the availability of substances that nourish that organ and tissue or there is an obstruction to the delivery of those nourishing substances.

If there is an obstacle to the delivery of nutrient, herbal and acupuncture therapies can be used to break through whatever is causing the blockage while simultaneously nourishing that which is deficient. If there is a simple a lack of available nutrient and nourishment, herbal tonics can be used to supplement and restore the function of the organs and tissues.

Fatigue is always due to either obstruction of needed substances or their unavailability and can usually be treated quite easily with Chinese herbal tonics and acupuncture.

Fatigue is a Qi (bio energy) and or blood vacuity. Qi and blood have a mutually dependent relationship, blood cannot move without Qi and Qi cannot be formed without blood.

The most important signs of Qi vacuity are fatigue, weakness, low voice, shortness of breath and spontaneous perspiration. Depending on the origin of the fatigue there will be other signs that help guide us to the correct medicines and acupuncture for treatment. For instance, if the lung Qi is deficient there will be more marked shortness of breath along with wheezing, cough, sputum and thirst. If the heart Qi is vacuous there will be palpitations and irregular heartbeat, anxiety and depression because the Qi and blood are unable to nourish the mind. If the digestive qi is deficient there is decreased appetite, loose stools, anorexia or weight gain. If the kidney Qi is vacuous there may be low back pain, weak legs and impotence in men and irregularities in the cycles of women.

Because Qi is a yang substance, its nature is movement and warmth. If there are signs of cold like cold limbs and aversion to cold, easily chilled and a desire for hot foods and warm drinks a more profound Qi deficiency is indicated.

All foods build blood but there are few foods, by themselves that directly build Qi. Here at Atlantic Acupuncture, we have developed Strength & Stamina as a tonic that nourishes essence, promotes digestive functions, nourishes blood, protects the liver, enhances blood circulation, and calms the mind.

Strength & Stamina is used for invigorating all organ functions and enhancing strength and endurance. Strength & Stamina is an adaptogen and research on the herbal medicines in this formula show that Strength & Stamina; decreases stress levels, adrenal hypertrophy, and vitamin C depletion. Improves swimming time to exhaustion and increases stamina.

Strength & Stamina enhances immune system function, protects the brain, Increases bone density and strength. Protects the liver Increases levels of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain (tied to mood and energy levels)

Elite runners given the key ingredients in Strength & Stamina finished their 10-kilometer race in 45 minutes, versus 52.6 minutes in the placebo groups. Anyone who takes part in running knows that this is a huge improvement.

In elite cyclists, a similarly profound effect was observed: 23.3% increase in total work performed and a 16.3% increase in time to exhaustion. This means the athletes not only worked longer but harder as well.

In elite skiers, the ingredients in Strength & Stamina improved tolerance to lower oxygen levels and enhanced adaptations to exercise.

The trend here is simple: studies were conducted in highly active, well-trained persons, and the ingredients in Strength & Stamina consistently exemplified a profound ergogenic, performance-enhancing effect.

In otherwise healthy persons, Strength & Stamina reduced the changes in heart rate and blood pressure associated with states of chronic stress. In patients with chronic fatigue, the ingredients in Strength & Stamina were found effective not only in reducing fatigue, but also in improving quality of life. In elderly subjects, Strength & Stamina improved cognitive function, social functioning, and quality of life.

The ingredients in Strength & Stamina have been shown to; increases strength, flexibility and bone density, lower resting heart rate, stabilize blood pressure, reduce LDL cholesterol, and improves microcirculation, peristalsis, decrease stress response while showing marked improvements in memory and concentration.

Strength & Stamina is only available at our Vero Beach clinic or through our online store.

Yours in good health,

Cindy & Robert Kienitz

Summer Heat Syndrome

On these hot and humid summer days in Vero Beach Florida, nothing beats a nice cool glass of water!

Most of us know that we need to stay hydrated, especially when we are working outdoors during the heat of the day. What a lot of people are not aware of is, that drinking a lot of water is good but water can push electrolytes out of our systems through perspiration and urination. Deficient electrolytes in our bodies can result in fatigue, cramping, nausea, dizziness, irregular heartbeat and eventually convulsions and coma. In Traditional Chinese Medicine these symptoms all fall under the disease category of “Summer Heat Syndrome”.

Electrolyte is a scientific term for salts, specifically ions. Electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells. Your kidneys work to keep the electrolyte concentrations in your blood constant despite changes in your body. When you exercise heavily, you lose electrolytes through perspiration and drinking plain water, though refreshing, does not replace them. The major electrolytes in your body are: sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate and sulfate.

These electrolytes must be replaced to keep the electrolyte concentrations of your body fluids constant. So, many sports drinks have sodium chloride or potassium chloride added to them. They also have sugar and flavorings to provide your body with extra energy and to make the drink taste better but many people find sports drinks too sugary and instead use the various forms of Pedialyte. Another alternative to sports drinks and Pedialyte are electrolyte replacement packets that you can find in camping supply or army surplus stores. One electrolyte replacements found in most drug stores is Emergen-C.
The traditional Chinese approach to Summer Heat Syndrome is simple, tasty and good for you. Rich in electrolytes, fiber and refreshing goodness, watermelon (xi gua) is the first choice of Chinese herbal medicine to treat and prevent Summer Heat Syndrome.
Whatever your choice of electrolyte replenishment, be sure to recharge every day and more often if you are engaged in outdoor activities of any kind.

Yours in good health,
Robert Kienitz, D.Ac.
www.atlantic-acupuncture.com

Summer Heat Syndrome

On these hot and humid summer days in Vero Beach Florida, nothing beats a nice cool glass of water! Most of us know that we need to stay hydrated, especially when we are working outdoors during the heat of the day. What a lot of people are not aware of is, that drinking a lot of water is good but water can push electrolytes out of our systems through perspiration and urination. Deficient electrolytes in our bodies can result in fatigue, cramping, nausea, dizziness, irregular heartbeat and eventually convulsions and coma. In Traditional Chinese Medicine these symptoms all fall under the disease category of Summer Heat Syndrome.

Electrolyte is a “medical/scientific” term for salts, specifically ions. Electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells. Your kidneys work to keep the electrolyte concentrations in your blood constant despite changes in your body. When you exercise heavily, you lose electrolytes through perspiration and drinking plain water, though refreshing, does not replace them. The major electrolytes in your body are: sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate and sulfate.
These electrolytes must be replaced to keep the electrolyte concentrations of your body fluids constant. So, many sports drinks have sodium chloride or potassium chloride added to them. They also have sugar and flavorings to provide your body with extra energy and to make the drink taste better but many people find sports drinks too sugary and instead use the various forms of Pedialyte. Another alternative to sports drinks and Pedialyte are electrolyte replacement packets that you can find in camping supply or army surplus stores. One electrolyte replacements found in most drug stores is Emergen-C.

The traditional Chinese approach to Summer Heat Syndrome is simple, tasty and good for you. Rich in electrolytes, fiber and refreshing goodness, watermelon (xi gua) is the first choice of Chinese herbal medicine to treat and prevent Summer Heat Syndrome.
Whatever your choice of electrolyte replenishment, be sure to recharge every day and more often if you are engaged in outdoor activities of any kind.

Yours in good health,
CIndy & Robert Kienitz, D.Ac.
www.atlantic-acupuncture.com

Summer Golf Facts and Tips

One of the most popular sports played here in sunny Florida is golf and one of the two most common sports related sources of injury is, you guessed it, golf. Here are a few fun facts and tips related to  this wonderful pastime.

If you choose to walk, rather than ride 18 holes, you will not only walk roughly four miles, but also burn 2,000 calories. To compare, golfers that ride carts burn about 1,300 calories.

To this day, golf is one of only two sports, along with the javelin throw, to have ever been played on the moon. Back on February 6, 1971, Apollo 14 member Alan Shepard hit a ball with a six-iron, swinging one-handed as a result of his pressure suit.

Every year, roughly 125,000 balls are hit into the water surrounding TPC Sawgrass’ world-renowned island green 17th hole.

The first ever golf balls were made of thin leather, stuffed with goose feathers. ‘Feather balls’ were used up until 1848, when they were replaced with the ‘guttie’ ball, named for the rubber-like sap of the Gutta tree, found in the tropics.

Each modern golf ball manufacturer creates different numbers of dimples on their golf balls but there are 336 dimples on a regulation, tournament golf ball.

When it comes to dimples, more is definitely better, as the dimples reduce wind resistance and allow the ball to fly higher. There is a trade-off, however, between possible height and possible distance: very dimple-dense balls will fly high but not go very far.

Golf balls travel much farther when the day is warm, so if you need a little extra umph to backup your swing, play on a hot day. The rubber components of a golf ball are more resilient when they are warm. Additionally, warm air is less dense than cold air and provides less resistance. So, if you’ve got a ball with the ideal number of dimples and it’s warm enough to make you sweat, you’re good to go.

53% of amateur golfers and 30% of professional golfers will play with an injured back this year. Golf injuries can result from a combination of poor posture, lack of muscle flexibility and coordination and incorrect equipment.

Most common golf injuries occur in the lower back, elbows, shoulders, hands and wrists, and are generally defined as either cumulative (overuse) or acute (traumatic) injuries. The impact and stress of the repetitive motion of the swing is sometimes hard on the muscles and joints, especially if you ignore the early warning signs of an injury such as; joint pain, tenderness, swelling, reduced range of motion, comparative weakness, and numbness and tingling.

Of the top ten injuries that can occur when playing golf, Acupuncture treats the first nine directly and very successfully. The tenth, fracture of the hamate bone, can be treated indirectly by decreasing both pain and healing time.

Acupuncture improves flexibility, circulation & coordination which will help keep you injury free and helps reduce down time after any injury.

Acupuncture is safe, effective and works quickly. Many of the Senior PGA players I have treated say that acupuncture also has the added benefit of helping to get them into that zone of mental clarity and relaxation that is so important to their game.

Whether you want to tune up your back or tune up your game or both, Acupuncture can help you arrive on the fairway pain free and on par.

Yours in good health,

Robert & Cindy Kienitz

Atlantic Acupuncture

Vero Beach, FL

www.atlantic-acupuncture.com

Brain Food for the 21st Century

Atlantic Institute has developed Brain Food, an herbal formula that is made up of the most effective balance of the finest and most potent brain enhancing herbal medicines in a concentrated (5:1) formula.

Brain Food has the best potential for deterring all of the signs and symptoms that are associated with dementia, senility and Alzheimer’s.

Brain Food is a proprietary blend of the following herbal medicines.

Acorus root has been shown in clinical trials to positively treat attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity. This herb is also used to treat other kinds of brain dysfunctions, including epilepsy, mental retardation, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Gingko leaf has been extensively evaluated and shown to enhance brain functions (including in those with Alzheimer’s disease) by improving brain circulation. It has also been reported to be helpful in treating depression, peripheral neuropathy, and other blood circulation disorders.

Hericium mushroom is an antibiotic, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-diabetic. It also promotes endurance, regulates blood pressure, is anti-aging, protects the heart, liver and kidneys, reduces anxiety and depression, and greatly improves cognitive function.

Siberian ginseng in Russia and other Asian countries Siberian ginseng has been used to enhance the strength,  performance and endurance of Olympic athletes for the last fifty years. Benefits include improved energy, better sleep, and improvement of digestive functions and all bowel conditions. Siberian ginseng invigorates blood circulation, lowers cholesterol, and is used to treat anemia, constitutional weakness, and helps offset conditions like macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataracts.

Although these herbs are often marketed individually, it has been found that using these herbal medicines in specific combinations actually gives the best results. For instance, the leaf of the ginkgo tree is particularly useful for increasing long term memory but not so much for short term, while acorus root is very good for short term memory but not as good as the gingko for long term memory. We have found that a comprehensive approach presents a more powerful alternative than simply taking ginkgo or other single herb extracts.

You can order a 30 day supply of concentrated Brain Food for $30.00 + Shipping today by visiting the Atlantic-acupuncture store.

Yours in good health,

Robert & Cindy Kienitz